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By Avon Podiatry Associates
May 16, 2017
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

Dry, itchy, inflamed or blistered skin on the feet are all symptoms of a fungal condition known as athlete’s foot. Formally known as tinea athlete's footpedis, athlete’s foot is an uncomfortable skin disease, usually appearing between the toes, that can quickly spread to the rest of the foot if not properly treated. Fortunately, there are several things you can do to prevent athlete’s foot in the first place. If you do develop this condition, though, a podiatrist can recommend an appropriate course of treatment. At Avon Podiatry Associates, Dr. Richard Grayson is your Avon foot doctor.

Symptoms of Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot develops when the fungus begins growing on the skin. Fungus thrives in warm, damp environments, such as showers, swimming pools, and locker room floors. The risk of developing athlete’s foot in these areas is especially high. Athletic shoes can also create this same warm, humid environment when the feet are regularly perspiring in them. The symptoms of athlete’s foot include skin that is dry, itchy, scaling, inflamed or blistered. These signs usually appear on the skin between the toes, but can also spread to other areas of the feet and body.

Caring For Your Feet

There are several steps you can take to care for your feet. For instance, keeping the feet clean and dry can help prevent athlete’s foot from developing. Not only can caring for your feet prevent athlete’s foot, but it can also help the skin heal more quickly if the condition has already developed. Your Avon foot doctor can recommend specific steps you can take to better care for the skin on your feet. Some things you can do right away to care for your feet and prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Wear shoes that are light and airy
  • Wear clean socks to keep the feet dry
  • Avoid walking around barefoot
  • Wear protective footwear in locker rooms and at public pools
  • Use talcum powder to minimize foot perspiration
  • Change socks often if heavy perspiration is a problem

Even with proper care of your feet, athlete’s foot can still develop. Fortunately, there are various over-the-counter fungicidal ointments that can help. More severe cases of athlete’s foot might require a prescription medication or ointment, which can be obtained through a podiatrist.

To prevent athlete’s foot, keep the feet clean and dry and avoid walking around barefoot. For treatment of athlete’s foot, see Dr. Grayson, your Avon foot doctor. To schedule an appointment, call Avon Podiatry Associates at (860) 677-7733.

By Avon Podiatry Associates
February 24, 2017
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Bunions  

Don’t let bunion pain ruin your favorite activities. Combat your symptoms now!bunions

For those whose bunions give them regular pain and discomfort, this post is for you! If you are sick and tired of catering to your bunion or changing up your routine to prevent it from rearing its ugly head, then it’s time you sought the advice of our Avon, CT, podiatrist Dr. Richard Grayson.

While surgery is the only way to actually correct a bunion, it isn’t always the best course of action for most. In fact, there are many non-invasive and more conservative methods for managing symptoms. The overall goals of bunion treatment are to alleviate pain and pressure, as well as to prevent the bunion from getting worse.

Common treatment options to consider include,

  • Icing the sore, achy joint several times a day for 15-20 minutes at a time
  • Using warm foot soaks if ice doesn’t seem to ease symptoms
  • Changing the types of shoes you wear. Only wear shoes with a wide toe box that won’t put pressure on the bunion.
  • Wearing a splint at night to help realign the joint and toe (to reduce morning pain and stiffness)
  • Talking to our Avon, CT, foot doctor about whether getting custom orthotics will provide the stabilization and comfort your joint needs to improve walking and standing

Try these treatments first and see if they provide you with the relief you need. If you find that pain continues to persist or gets worse, despite months of trying to manage your symptoms, then it’s time to come in for a consultation. During this consultation, we can determine the severity of your misalignment and help create a treatment plan that will better control your pain and inflammation. Bunion surgery (also known as a bunionectomy) will be considered if bunion pain is severe or lasts for well over a year without relief.

If bunion pain has gotten the better of you and you are ready to find out how a medical professional can help, then why not turn to the experts at Avon Podiatry Associates in Avon, CT? We are ready to help you get your bunion pain under control once and for all.

By Avon Podiatry Associates
January 04, 2017
Category: Podiatry
Tags: corns   hammertoes  

These foot problems are more common than you might think.

Find out more about them and what you can do to prevent them.

No one thinks that foot problems can happen to them and unfortunately most people don’t even know they have any issues until it’s too corns and hammertoeslate. A hammertoe is a malformation that causes the joint of a toe to stiffen and bend downward. You will recognize a hammertoe because they often look claw-like. From the office of our Avon, CT, podiatrist, Dr. Richard Grayson, learn more about corns and hammertoes and how to treat them.

A corn is the thick buildup of skin that appears on the side or top of a toe. They are usually caused by friction from shoes that are too tight or from rubbing up against another toe. Corns can be unsightly and, as you may already imagine, rather painful. But a corn is letting you know that there may be a bigger foot problem at hand. It may just be warning you that you have a hammertoe.

A hammertoe is often the result of a muscle imbalance. Heredity is usually to blame for this issue. Therefore, if other family members suffer from a hammertoe you are more likely to develop one, too. A hammertoe may affect one joint or both joints of a toe, causing it to bend downward.

How do I treat a corn and hammertoe?

Many patients respond well to conservative treatment options. When you come in for an evaluation, our Avon foot doctor will be able to provide you with some ways to manage your symptoms and prevent the problem from getting worse. Common treatments include:

  • Wider, properly fitted shoes
  • Shaving down the corn (known as debridement)
  • Non-medicated pads to protect the corn from friction
  • Over-the-counter and/or prescription pain relievers

If these treatment options don’t provide you with the relief you need, then we will discuss whether surgery is necessary.

Are your symptoms indicative of a hammertoe? If so, then it’s a good idea to get the medical attention your feet need to prevent the issue from getting worse. Call Avon Podiatry Associates in Avon, CT, today.

By Avon Podiatry Associates
November 03, 2016
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Heel Pain  

Find out if the shoes you wear could actually be causing your foot problems.

Our feet take a lot of abuse, even from the shoes we wear. Think about it: maybe you wear tight-fitted loafers or high heels to work every heel painday. Perhaps you think you’re giving your feet a reprieve when you wear your comfy athletic shoes, but, unfortunately, you haven’t replaced them in years. And, when summer hits, it’s time to pull out the flip-flops and sandals, which often don’t provide enough support, so it’s not surprising for our Avon, CT podiatrist, Dr. Richard Grayson, to hear that you are experiencing heel pain. Could it really be the result of your shoes or is there something more going on?

If you are someone who has high arches, you’ll want to be careful about which kind of footwear you opt for. You will only want to wear shoes that provide extra cushioning and have a short heel (nothing higher than 2 inches). If you experience pain due to flat feet, then it might be time to talk to our Avon, CT, foot doctor about whether custom orthotics (also known as shoe inserts) could provide you with the relief you need.

Those with flat feet or high arches are more susceptible to developing plantar fasciitis, an inflammatory condition that often causes persistent heel pain. If you don’t offer your feet the proper arch support they need, you may end up dealing with nasty and painful conditions, like bunions or hammertoes.

If you are an athlete who works out or plays a sport three or more times a week, then you need to wear the proper shoes for exercise. Opt for quality running shoes and turn to a specialty shoe store to help fit you with the right shoes that will provide enough stability and support to prevent heel pain, fractures and other issues that can befall athletes. You should also replace these shoes every 3-4 months. If you don’t replace your athletic shoes often enough, then this might just be the reason you are dealing with heel pain.

While it’s much easier to follow this advice during the colder months, once summer hits it’s important that you avoid wearing flip-flops as much as possible. While they are a must-have to protect your feet when using gym showers and locker rooms, they shouldn’t be worn for walking long distances. If you are someone who just can’t part with your flip-flops, then this could certainly be causing your heel pain.

Don’t let heel pain dictate your day-to-day schedule. Nix your pain in no time by turning to Avon Podiatry Associates in Avon, CT, for the proper treatment plan that will get you back on your feet in no time.

August 17, 2016
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Bunions  

BunionsA bunion is an abnormal, bony prominence that develops on the joint at the base of your big toe. As the big toe joint becomes enlarged, it forces the toe to crowd against your other toes, and the pressure exerted on your big toe joint results in inflammation and pain. Early treatment is necessary to decrease the risk of developing joint deformities.

Bunions develop due to prolonged abnormal pressure or motion on your big toe joint, most often caused by inherited structural defects, poor-fitting shoes, foot injuries, or congenital deformities. Women are generally more prone to bunions because of the shoe types typically worn, such as high-heels and narrow-toed shoes.

Bunion pain can range from mild to severe, often making it difficult to wear shoes and perform normal activities. You should contact our office if you notice the following symptoms:

  • An enlarged, visible bulge on your big toe joint
  • Restricted movement of your big toe or foot that prevents you from performing normal activities
  • Irritation, corns or calluses caused by the overlap of the first and second toes
  • Frequent pain, swelling or redness around your big toe joint

Treatment For a Bunion

Treatment for a bunion will vary depending on its severity. Identifying the condition in its early stages is important to avoid surgery, with the main objective of early treatment being to relieve pressure and stop the progression of the deformity. Many times conservative treatments, such as padding, modified footwear or orthotic devices can be highly effective for preventing further growth and reducing the pressure and pain.

We recommend the following for reducing pressure and pain caused by bunions:

  • Wear comfortable shoes that don't cramp or irritate your toes and avoid high-heeled shoes
  • Apply ice to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Our podiatrists can show you how to apply padding to your foot to place it in its normal position and reduce stress on the bunion

When early treatments fail or the persistent pain associated with your bunion is interfering with your daily activities, a surgical procedure may be recommended as a last resort to realign the toe joint and alleviate the pressure. We can advise you on the best treatment options available to relieve pressure on the bunion and slow the progression of the joint deformity.





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